Friday, September 27, 2013

IV. A Tribute to Kofi Awooonor by Yaayi Aawa: Souffles by Birago Diop

Let me say that when the idea of providing a platform for those who want to pay tribute to the renowned poet, Kofi Awoonor, was introduced to me I never thought it will go beyond the first day. Today's entry, the fourth in the series, is from Yaayi Aawa, a Senegalese poet. Yaayi's tribute to Kofi Awoonor is a poem by Birago Diop, a renowned Senegalese poet and part of the Negritude movement. The poem is in its original French; however, for the sake of other readers, I have searched for its English translation. The title Souffles is translated as 'Spirits' in English.

According to Yaayi,
I did not know about Kofi Awoonor before this tragedy, and this is truly sad, but I do feel it is a great loss not only for Ghanaians but for the whole continent. So, that piece ... is my tribute to him.
-Souffles-


Ecoute plus souvent
Les choses que les êtres,
La voix du feu s'entend,
Entends la voix de l'eau.
Ecoute dans le vent
Le buisson en sanglot:
C'est le souffle des ancêtres.

Ceux qui sont morts ne sont jamais partis
Ils sont dans l'ombre qui s'éclaire
Et dans l'ombre qui s'épaissit,
Les morts ne sont pas sous la terre
Ils sont dans l'arbre qui frémit,
Ils sont dans le bois qui gémit,
Ils sont dans l'eau qui coule,
Ils sont dans la case, ils sont dans la foule
Les morts ne sont pas morts.
Ecoute plus souvent Les choses que les êtres, La voix du feu s'entend, Entends la voix de l'eau. Ecoute dans le vent Le buisson en sanglot: C'est le souffle des ancêtres.

Le souffle des ancêtres morts
Qui ne sont pas partis,
Qui ne sont pas sous terre,
Qui ne sont pas morts.
Ceux qui sont morts ne sont jamais partis,
Ils sont dans le sein de la femme,
Ils sont dans l'enfant qui vagit,
Et dans le tison qui s'enflamme.
Les morts ne sont pas sous la terre,
Ils sont dans le feu qui s'éteint,
Ils sont dans le rocher qui geint,
Ils sont dans les herbes qui pleurent,
Ils sont dans la forêt, ils sont dans la demeure,
Les morts ne sont pas morts.

Ecoute plus souvent Les choses que les êtres, La voix du feu s'entend, Endents la voix de l'eau. Ecoute dans le vent Le buisson en sanglot: C'est le souffle des ancêtres.

Il redit chaque jour le pacte, Le grand pacte qui lie, Qui lie à la loi notre sort; Aux actes des souffles plus forts Le sort de nos morts qui ne sont pas morts; Le lourd pacte qui nous lie à la vie, La lourde loi qui nous lie aux actes Des souffles qui se meurent.

Dans le lit et sur les rives du fleuve, Des souffles qui se meuvent Dans le rocher qui geint et dans l'herbe qui pleure. Des souffles qui demeurent Dans l'ombre qui s'éclaire ou s'épaissit, Dans l'arbe qui frémit, dans le bois qui gqmit, Et dans l'eau qui coule et dans l'eau qui dort, Des souffles plus forts, qui ont prise Le souffle des morts qui ne sont pas morts, Des morts qui ne sont pas partis, Des morts qui ne sont plus sous terre.

Ecoute plus souvent Les choses que les êtres.
____________________________
In English


-Spirits-

Listen to Things
More often than Beings,
Hear the voice of fire,
Hear the voice of water.
Listen in the wind,
To the sighs of the bush;
This is the ancestors breathing.

Those who are dead are not ever gone;
They are in the darkness that grows lighter
And in the darkness that grows darker.
The dead are not down in the earth;
They are in the trembling of the trees
In the groaning of the woods,
In the water that runs,
In the water that sleeps,
They are in the hut, they are in the crowd:
The dead are not dead.

Listen to Things
More often than Beings,
Hear the voice of fire,
Hear the voice of water.
Listen in the wind,
To the bush that is sighing:
This is the breathing of ancestors,
Who have not gone away
Who are not under earth
Who are not really dead.

Those who are dead are not ever gone;
They are in a woman's breast,
In the wailing of a child,
And the burning of a log,
In the moaning rock,
In the weeping grasses,
In the forest and the home.
The dead are not dead.

Listen more often
To Things than to Beings,
Hear the voice of fire,
Hear the voice of water.
Listen in the wind to
The bush that is sobbing:
This is the ancestors breathing.

Each day they renew ancient bonds,
Ancient bonds that hold fast
Binding our lot to their law,
To the will of the spirits stronger than we
To the spell of our dead who are not really dead,
Whose covenant binds us to life,
Whose authority binds to their will,
The will of the spirits that stir
In the bed of the river, on the banks of the river
The breathing of spirits
Who moan in the rocks and weep in the grasses.

Spirits inhabit
The darkness that lightens, the darkness that darkens,
The quivering tree, the murmuring wood,
The water that runs and the water that sleeps:
Spirits much stronger than we,
The breathing of the dead who are not really dead,
Of the dead who are not really gone,
Of the dead now no more in the earth.

Listen to Things
More often than Beings
Hear the voice of fire,
Hear the voice of water.
Listen to the wind,
To the bush that is sobbing:
This is the ancestors, breathing.

1 comment:

  1. Indeed, Awoonor lives on! A powerful poem that celebrates the dead even as it celebrates nature and the bonds that binds man to the earth. Wonderfully haunting.

    ReplyDelete

Help Improve the Blog with a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Featured post

Njoroge, Kihika, & Kamiti: Epochs of African Literature, A Reader's Perspective

Source Though Achebe's Things Fall Apart   (1958) is often cited and used as the beginning of the modern African novel written in E...