Monday, July 09, 2012

33. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald*

The Great Gatsby (Scribner, 1925; 214) was read for the 'difficult to read' section of the Top 100 Books challenge. The story is pitiful but interesting. It tells of real human nature and how money attracts friends like flies to honey but troubles dispels them like a repellent. 

In this story set in New York, the enigmatic Gatsby has moved into the neighbourhood, possibly to get closer to his childhood lover, Daisy, who is now married. He is now rich and throws several parties in the hope that Daisy, to whom Nick is related through her husband Tom, would pass through. He lives in the same neighbourhood as Nick Carraway and the Buchanans (Daisy and Tom). Tom himself loves fan and cheats on his wife with the wife of an old friend of his. Finally, Gatsby - through Nick - invited Daisy to his plush mansion. Daisy is now in between thoughts; however a series of events would lead to several deaths, including Gatsby. And there, he would be left alone.

The distance between the read and the review was so long, and the time taken up by several activities that only the general story is still in my head. Thus, this review is going to be the shortest ever. What I remember however is that the narrative style created a distance between the narrator, Nick, and the main character, Gatsby. I also saw a lot of human failings and people who acted upon incomplete or inaccurate information. In the end, I found myself pitying Gatsby for the extremes of his love toward Daisy and the childish ways he carried his love. I hated, extremely, the way the Buchanans, especially Daisy, take advantage of everybody and everything. Tom was a coward who couldn't confront and compete in anything; jealous of anyone who got closer to his wife yet was the first to cheat on him.

Another thing I hazily remember was that I enjoyed the story, thoroughly.
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* The Authorized Text edition

8 comments:

  1. I re-read this not too long ago, and really liked it. Short, but definitely saying a lot.

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    Replies
    1. I agree Nina. It's short but says a lot.

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  2. I've heard so much about this book Nana and though I have not read it, from your review I gather that The Great Gatsby is also about the superficiality and vanity of man. I will certainly want to read it. It happens to be on the list of quite a number of partcipants in the Classics Club hosted by Jillian of A Room of One's Own. You may want to check it out and join. Thanks for sharing.

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    Replies
    1. Yes it has that theme also. And how man tends to use another man for his personal gain.

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  3. stunning isn't it Nana I loved this when I read it years ago looking forward to the new film that is due later this year so may reread it for that ,all the best stu

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    Replies
    1. Yes, Stud. I will check the movie out when it's released.

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  4. I need to reread this one, as I haven't read it since high school. It was one of my very favorite books, and I know that my love for it probably won't be diminished. I just want to experience it all over again. Great review today, Nana.

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