Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Introducing Fred McBagonluri's New Book, Harvest of Jenes

Last year, I introduced to you Fred McBagonluri. In an interview he granted ImageNations he stated that his books - Harvest of Jenes and  Flames of Will - were in advanced stages of completion. In fact, the former was schedule for release in December 2010; unfortunately, this was not to be. I am, however, happy to inform you that Harvest of Jenes has been published and available for purchase on amazon.

Dr. McBagonluri was a former employee of Siemens Hearing Solutions and headed the Research and Development department of the company. He was voted in 2008 as the Most Promising Black Engineer of the Year and in that same year won the New Jersey State Healthcare Business Innovator Hero Award. He is a co-inventor for three issued US patents. Currently, he is a Sloan Fellow at MIT. (Continue reading here)

About Harvest of Jenes (from Amazon): The encounter was brief and at first benign. It portended some sort of effortless bliss. The repercussions, however, lasted a lifetime. Indeed, when our principles encounter reality, the confluence of that encounter remains fuzzy. It was lust the first time, love the second time and lies forever. Her succulence found potential in the curls of his muscular arms. To encounter Haile is to embrace ill-will but to reject her is to leave behind wealth. Harvest of Jenes is whirlpool of intrigue, suspense, soul-numbing thrill.
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Note: Fred has given ImageNations a copy of this book and so better watch this space for a review next year.

2 comments:

  1. Great to hear the book is out. Not sure it's for me, but sounds interesting for sure. I wish him well and lots of success.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Amy, I know. However, since I've not yet read any of his books I can't convince you. Let's see what comes out of the read. Thanks

    ReplyDelete

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