Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Chimamanda Adichie: Dangers of a Single Story

Ever since I listened to Chimamanda's Dangers of a Single Story, I have mentioned and referred to it several times. I refer to it any time people try to stereotype others; anytime people try to define others using lexical and imagistic clichés. However, due to the recent upsurge in negative reportage from mainstream media, such as CNN - which are suppose to know best - and smaller outlets like motherboard, I think it is high time I posted it here on my blog, rather than referring people to it, which I am not certain they would actually open it. Some colleague bloggers, Obed Sarpong and Edward Tagoe, have responded to this reportage. The story has several inaccuracies but these had already been pointed out by these two bloggers. I would want to tackle the mere idea of leaving ones country with a prejudiced mind to have confirmed what one has heard and seen much too often on the news and in the newspapers. To do this, I would kindly employ, at least virtually, the author of Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun and The Thing Around Your Neck, Chimamanda Adichie to do it for me as I can hardly say it any better. Kindly listen to this and if you have already listened to this, you can listen again.

10 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing this; and I was impressed to read your poem today at Kinna Reads. I had no idea you were such a talented poet, although I've enjoyed your thoughtful posts.

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  2. I love her! And I love this post too.

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  3. @Bibliophiliac thanks. I once in a while do post my poems here. Glad you like it.

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  4. @MightyAfrican yeah she's such a wonderful figure. I have enjoyed this speech every time i have listened to it.

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  5. Absolutely love this TED presentation! So beautifully articulated... and I like the connection you make to recent discourse on the sakawa boys! love it!

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  6. @yeh, thanks bro. sometimes when these things are said or done it hurts so much. I definitely don't think all Western Adult Males are like Josef Fritzl who kidnapped a lady and impregnated her or all teenagers are like Loughner who shot the American Congress Woman in Arizona, or like the shooters in the Columbine Massacre or like Hitler, like Stalin, like Lenin. I have heard of several serial killers from the West, several rape cases, several mothers killing their children, several people with weird behaviours like walking naked in pubs, having sex in public places etc. But have never bunched them together.

    Yet, I would say most westerners do think we live in ratholes. Perhaps we reserve the deepest tunnels for their presidents and leaders when they come visiting.

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  7. I love, love, love this lecture. Great idea to share it, definitely relevant.

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  8. no better way i could think of in response. Glad you saw it fitting

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