Monday, February 14, 2011

Proverb Monday

Proverb: Sε ɔdehye anko a, akoa dwane
Translation: If the royal does not go into battle, the slave runs away
Usage: If a leader does not give a good example, his followers will desert him. From my understanding, this proverb has been used to mean that if those who stand to benefit from an action does not lead the people, the followers there only to help would do worse by deserting him. This proverb has roots in the period when a Chief/King is supposed to lead his people into battle. I believe that if the American and British people had known this proverb they would have insisted that George Walker Bush and Tony Blair would follow their men into battle. And if every blood-thirsty leader do this, I believe the lust for war would decline. Currently, in Ghana there are stories that the opposition presidential candidate has made statements that could incite people to violence in the coming election. According to the tapes, he said they would match the current government boot for boot and that 'all die be die'... thus, there is no difference in deaths. I hope when the time comes and he is calling on the people to fight, his children, wife, family and he himself would lead the people. In effect I hope he would lead by deeds and not by words.
(No. 1781, Page 88 in Bu me Bε by Peggy Appiah et al.)
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Caveat: In the 'Usage' I have added my personal understanding of the proverb.

4 comments:

  1. Nana, this is a wonderful proverb to start the day with. I really did enjoyed your own personal meaning and understanding of the proverb. I do see some linkages there. Great interpretation.

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  2. @Geosi, yes! I hate it when people become belligerent in their speeches. If only the makers of war would themselves fight in those wars we would all be okay.

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  3. So powerful and true, and a lesson we really need to take more seriously.

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  4. @Amy...lol. Yes, if we all do we would all begin to live happily in this world on this earth.

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