Monday, October 18, 2010

Library Additions

Last week I treated myself to a an unprecedented book-buying spree. I love books and would do everything to get them; however, I never never done this before - buying 10 books in a five days? So here is list:

Anthills of the Savannah by Chinua Achebe
This is a book I think I should have read long long time ago. I don't know why I haven't, better now than never. Chinua Achebe, winner of the Man Booker International - awarded every two years for an author's entire portfolio, is one author whose non-recognition by the Nobel committee has puzzled me. His most popular offering, Things Fall Apart, paved the way for many writers. There is no one who has read African novels, who hasn't read this book, possibly. This book was shortlisted for the Man Booker in 1987.

A Man of the People by Chinua Achebe
Same story as above. Any story by Achebe is worth the read, I believe so.

Contemporary African Short Stories edited by Chinua Achebe and C. L. Innes
This is a collection of short stories from all parts of Africa. Contributors include Nadine Gordimer (Nobel Laureate), Ben Okri (Booker Winner), Kojo Laing, and many others. This is a great collection I believe all must endeavour to have. 

Matigari by Ngugi wa Thiong'o
I have only read Weep Not Child. I have A Grain of Wheat on my list of TBR. However, ever since he became a Nobel hopeful I have decided to read almost every offering this great author has made. It would have been a disgrace as someone dedicated to promoting African Literature to have not read, adequately, a hopeful laureate. So I am working hard to improve this. This novel was first written, as most of his novels, in Gikuyu - the author's native language, and translated into English.

Changes by Ama Ata Aidoo
Now comes the shame, the gender imbalance in my African readings. I have only read Buchi Emecheta, Chimamanda Adichie, Ayesha Harruna Atta, Nana Ekua Brew Hammond (and ...). The funny thing is that I have not read Anowa by Ama Ata Aidoo, one of the novels on my TBR. I searched for it and couldn't find it at the Legon Bookshop so I purchased this in place. According to Amy of Amy Reads she loved this book and I hope I would love it too. Ama Ata Aidoo is a prominent Ghanaian writer.

Chaka by Thomas Molofo
Chaka is on my TBR. This is a novel I have always passed by in the bookshop without knowing why. Finally, I couldn't skip it anymore. It was written in the author's native language and translated into English by Daniel P. Kunene. 

The Blinkards by Kobina Sekyi
The Blinkards is one of the oldest story ever written by a Ghanaian. Kobina Sekyi makes fun of the Fantes and their rapacity for foreign things including names. I have not read it so cannot say much about it. I bought this book because of its long-ago nature.

Sand Daughter by Sarah Bryant
Was in a bookshop which was about closing. The lady there waited for me to look through the books and so I bought this book together with the next two out of appreciation for her kind nature. However, I also love fell in love with the cover and the blurb. It has to do with the Crusades and all that. 

Shadow Catcher by Marianne Wiggins
The author was shortlisted for one award (Pulitzer?) I don't remember but that was why I added it. If I am buying a book by an author I don't know I rely on her credentials: shortlisted for Pulitzer, Booker, National Book Award etc; or winner of this and that award. It helps if I don't know the author.

The Secret Destiny of America by Manly P. Hall
I love conspiracy theories. I read Jim Mars Ruled by Secrecy and enjoyed it. I have always wanted to know why this and that. I have never trusted the things I see with my eyes. I believe a lot of things we hear as disasters are planned and executed, well except the natural ones. So I purchased Manly's book for these.

For all the books I purchased only one (Chaka) was on my TBR. Again, seven (those by African authors) would be reviewed on this blog. With these, I hope the blog would become more vibrant.

Follow me, here or on twitter or even facebook, and let's have a jolly time.

10 comments:

  1. What a wonderful list. I'm eager to read your reviews now! :-)

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  2. I'm impressed with this list! Great!

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  3. Thanks Geosi. I hope I read through them fast enough

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  4. What a great selection of books! I really hope you enjoy Changes :)

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  5. Nice selection. Sand daughter looks interesting.

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  6. @Myne thanks. Yes, that picture drew me in.

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  7. I really like Anthills of the Savannah when I read it. I like the title. I've been meaning to read The Blinkards. And Thomas Mofolo's book Chaka is one I want to read also. Wonderful additions to your library. Where did you buy the books?

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  8. @Kinna, thanks. God all of them from Legon bookshop except the last three which come from SyTris, East Legon.

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